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Fall 2022
May 22, 2022
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Ignatius Seminar - 11641 - IDST 010 - 01

EVOLUTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

Beyond biology, many aspects of our daily lives make better sense in the light of evolution. Why do we get fevers when we’re sick? Why do we eat more beef than buffalo? Why are puppies and kittens so cute? Why are so few of us left handed?

We will start by defining what evolution is and learning how it operates. We will read selected chapters from Darwin’s On the Origin of Species along with modern explanations of evolution and natural selection. We will then apply this knowledge to different facets of our lives. How has evolution influenced the symptoms we experience when we have an infection and the traits we emphasized in domesticated plants and animals? When and where did dogs and cats first come into our homes? How do our relationships and our athletic abilities continue to be shaped by natural selection? We will finish the course by discussing how we might apply our understanding of evolutionary processes to address current problems, like emerging diseases or antibiotic resistance, and to prevent future ones.

We will read a variety of authors, from Victorian naturalists to journalists to research scientists. In our discussions we will consider not just what we know, but how we know it and how we write about it. What are the methods used to test evolutionary hypotheses and how do our ideas change as we develop new techniques and get new information? What is gained or lost when a message is adjusted for different audiences?

This course emphasizes active learning, with discussions, lectures, simulations and demonstrations, individual and group projects. We will take advantage of Georgetown’s proximity to museums to discover examples of evolution impacting our daily lives represented in art and artifacts.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Science for All

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 12:15 pm MW Car Barn 205A Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Jennifer A Fox E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 11642 - IDST 010 - 02
FINDING WISDOM IN DISTRESS

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will examine the possibility of using meditation, music, and horror films to manage attention and to regulate distress. For example: we will consider the way that Remi Weekes depicts the trauma of social collapse in the film "His House"; we will investigate Jennifer Kent‘s presentation of grief and loss in "The Babadook"; and we will consider Cattle Decapitation’s "Death Atlas", and Anohni’s "Hopelessness", as presentations of the horror of anthropogenic climate change. Each class session will begin with a 15-minute group meditation, which will help us to understand how subjective experience changes in social contexts. In one of the meetings each week, we will then discuss a philosophical or scientific perspective on distress, anxiety, or trauma. And in the other meeting, we will examine a horror film, or a pair of recent musical works, which provide an alternative perspective on such experiences, or yield intriguing insights into what it takes to survive and flourish in a complex world. I hope to provide an optional time for us to watch each of the films as a group. No one will be required to do this, and you will always be able to watch the films on your own; but it can often be fun to watch horror films together, and this can sometimes make it easier to get immersed in the film. Finally, during the weekend of Halloween (10/29 or 10/30), we will also get together to watch two or three films, with catering (gluten free, with vegetarian and vegan options). Over the course of the semester, we will try to figure out what various forms of art can teach us about distressing experiences; and we will ask whether music and horror films can function in a way that parallels the use of meditation for managing distress and uncertainty. Along the way, we will also attempt to build strong social bonds, and we will work to cultivate useful strategies for managing the stress and discomfort that we will all inevitably face.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Philosophy/General

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Intercultural Center 209B Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Larry Bryce Huebner E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 11643 - IDST 010 - 03


HUMAN FLOURISHING, EAST AND WEST

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

When asked for his advice on living a good life, Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel responded, “Think higher. Live deeper.” Taking the world’s spiritual, religious, and philosophical traditions as our guide, this seminar will explore what it means to live deeper—to lead lives that are not only satisfying or happy, but genuinely fulfilling. From the sages and philosophers of the Confucian, Daoist, Buddhist, and Hindu traditions to those of the ancient Greek, Christian, Islamic, and Jewish traditions, we will travel the world through some of the greatest texts ever written in search of what human flourishing meant not only throughout human history, but what it means for us today.

From the role of friends and family in a good life to virtues like gratitude and generosity, a variety of themes and questions will guide us: Why did ancient Daoist philosophers believe that being in nature contributes to our flourishing? Do each of us have a particular vocation or calling, as some Christian thinkers have argued? Why did Confucian sages insist that humans need rituals and music to lead fulfilling lives? Were Hindu and Buddhist philosophers correct that desires impede our flourishing? What about Plato’s contention that in order to flourish we must seek not only the truth, but also goodness and beauty?

We will also examine many lived experiences of human flourishing today, from the ascetic lives of Buddhist monks and Jesuit priests to the simplicity embraced by Amish communities. We will explore Ignatius of Loyola’s contention that the spirit, like the body, needs exercise to flourish by looking to a variety of practices, from meditation and prayer to pilgrimage. We will also examine the impact of challenges such as poverty, grief, and disability, and the reasons why almost every major tradition, East and West, warns us that the pursuit of material wealth can profoundly undermine our flourishing.

Our aim will be to think higher with these great traditions, East and West, as they describe for us what it means to live deeper.


Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global, College/THEO X-listed Course, Core: Theology

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Reynolds 133 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Erin Cline E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 14998 - IDST 010 - 04


BLACKNESS AS AN ORGANIZING STRATEGY: BLACK PARTICIPATION IN POST-CIVIL RIGHTS SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

In the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950’s and 1960’s, African Americans were at the center of one of the most important political struggles in US history. To this day, the commitment to racial equality is especially strong among African Americans. But how engaged are they in other social movements? What role do they play in non-racial social movements? Can we even describe a contemporary social movement as “non-racial”? How have later movements drawn on the strategies and rhetoric of the African American Civil Rights Movement? What effect has the success of later social movements had on African Americans’ political organizing? This seminar is devoted to addressing these and related questions.

In this seminar, you will gain a broad introduction to interdisciplinary perspectives on contemporary social movements. Conversations will draw on history, sociology, queer studies, political science, and philosophy in examining the development of a variety of campaigns for legal rights, government protection, human dignity, and political power. Specifically, the course uses the experiences of African Americans to provide a more general understanding of the historical development, cultural impact, and political successes of a range of post-1960’s US social movements. The course will focus on the impact of African American participation (or lack thereof) in the women’s equality movement, LGBT rights, the environmental justice movement, and the contemporary political conservative movement. We will also examine how contemporary racial justice movements intersect with social movements across the political spectrum. We will concentrate on linkages and overlap between struggles for racial equality and contemporary political organizing.

Our goal is to think more expansively about the relationship between identity, politics, and social change. The seminar will utilize a variety of active learning strategies, so participants should be prepared for engaged participation in each session.


Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, X-List: SOCI

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm MW Reynolds 130 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Corey Fields E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 11645 - IDST 010 - 05


PAST/PRESENT: CONTEMPORARY PLAYS WITH STAKES IN THE PAST

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

This seminar investigates (great) plays that creatively constellate past and present in order to activate psychic, social, and theatrical stakes. Shaped by diverse cultural perspectives, our primary source materials will include solo performances, ghost plays, musicals, and history plays, with themes ranging from revenge to love, justice to identity. We will consider two classical plays (one by Shakespeare, one an Asian classic) where the past intercedes in the present as examples of this deep dramatic tradition. Then we will flash-forward to an array of major recent plays from Britain, the Americas, Australia and South Africa, including Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton, Sarah Ruhl’s The Clean House, Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, Naomi Wallace’s The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek, Michael Frayn’s Copenhagen, and Natalie Marlena Goodnow’s Mud Offerings, as well as works by Christine Evans, Marcus Gardley, and (Georgetown Alum and Cherokee Playwright/Lawyer) Mary Nagle. We will read the plays as texts for performance that ignite theatrical imaginaries as well as distinct cultural and critical perspectives.

We will draw on interdisciplinary methods, informed by essays by scholars as well as by artists, engaging questions such as: How and why are multiple time periods activated in this play? What ethical, cultural, critical, creative, and/or human insights are stirred by staging more than one time period—sometimes simultaneously? How does the medium of theater and/or performance deepen or complicate the play’s distinctive stakes? How do these plays differently cast our role/s as audience? In what context was this work first written and staged—and how might new contexts shift its perspective, even its politics?

In this interdisciplinary seminar, students will be called upon to engage close readings, imagination, research, and each other. Together we will share meals, host a playwright, and see at least two performances, including in the Davis Performing Arts Center whose 2018-19 season theme connects to ours. All students will write critical papers and experiment with creative work as a way to deepen and diversify our understanding of the past/present, plays—and ourselves.


Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, Core:HALC - Hum, Art, Lit, Cul, X-List: TPST

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Davis Ctr. for Performing Arts 025 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Maya Roth E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 11648 - IDST 010 - 07


MAGIS: THE REAL METAVERSE

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

This course is designed to help students understand religion in light of the magis, a Jesuit term that means “the greater good.” We begin by questioning assumptions that nature, the earthly environment we inhabit, is reducible to physical realities. From there, we consider the ways in which we know this habitat of ours, that is, our human rationality, which is never limited to analytical logic. This unit will include relevant excursions (the national cemetery and/or arboretum). We then turn to emotionality, especially the so-called pain and pleasure sequences, which, when understood properly, sharpen our desire to be in communion with both fellow creatures and our creator. This unit will include attending a relevant Shakespearean play. We also read the autobiography of Saint Ignatius of Loyola with a focus on his method of discerning spirits in all experience and his awareness of a world (unseen but still present) governed by compassion. We conclude with a foray into the matrix of freedom where life is pursued not by coercion but by conviction, that is, out of devotion to goodness (the stuff of religion). This unit will include a visit to a local religious community. Throughout, we pursue course topics in light of today’s current crises (from climate to opioids to inequality) to garner perspective on the way religion is deeply invested in the needs of society, that is, the greater good. The course thus prepares students to see their undergraduate experience as a forum to grow in awareness of the magis in their own lives as well as in society, that is, to view their studies as a means to strengthen their own inner resources and commitments—goodness as operative in their daily experiences—at a time when the metaverse and other forms of surveillance capitalism seek dominion over their decision-making capacities.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, Core: Diversity/Global, College/THEO X-listed Course, Core: Theology

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Car Barn 302 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Paul Heck E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 11650 - IDST 010 - 08


DISABILITY, CULTURE, AND QUESTION OF CARE

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

One in four Americans lives with some form of disability; people with disabilities are the world’s largest minority. Each of us has been touched, within one generation, by the disability experience. And if we live long enough, we will all, one day, experience some form of disability. This course introduces students to Disability Studies, an interdisciplinary field premised on two powerful ideas: that disability is a fundamental aspect of all human experience and that disability has produced a range of identities and communities that merit exploration in themselves and shed light on normative conceptions of body, mind, social relations, and what makes a good life.

Together, we will explore the role that disability plays in our lives and our culture through the particular lens of care. Many questions will structure our discussion: What does cura personalis mean in our everyday experience? How do we care for one another from childhood through aging? How are our relationships of care charged with the power dynamics of class and gender, structuring social and economic institutions from the family to the workforce to national and international policies? Does the work of care conflict with or engender creativity in literature and art? And how might understanding ourselves through our dependency on others reframe such core American values as independence and individualism?

These questions will shape our study of the ways disability gets constructed in discourses ranging from law and policy, to film, plays, novels, memoirs, and poetry. Throughout the course, we will have visits from — and travel to meet — people doing groundbreaking work in disability arts and culture; we’ll visit Gallaudet, the world’s foremost Deaf university; we’ll have dinner at L’Arche, an inter-denominational Christian community that brings people with and without intellectual disabilities to live together; and we’ll look creatively at questions of access and inclusion at Georgetown.


Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: X-List: DBST, Core: Diversity/Domestic, Core:HALC - Hum, Art, Lit, Cul, X-List: ENGL

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm TR St. Marys 120 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Libbie Rifkin E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 20315 - IDST 010 - 09
This section will take place in Healy 207.

ADDRESSING ASSUMPTIONS THAT SUSTAIN INEQUALITIES

Georgetown College First-Year Students Only

In this Ignatius Seminar we will examine a range of ideas and the assumptions underpinning them that have become embedded in many of our current institutions, laws, customs, and cultural practices. In particular, we shall address assumptions leading to structures which have sustained injustices that remain potent today. Registration in this course requires instructor approval.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Philosophy/General

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:00 am - 10:45 am M Off Campus ROOM Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar John J. De Gioia E-mail
Colloquium TBA   Off Campus ROOM Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar John J. De Gioia E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 34324 - IDST 010 - 10


SOCIALISM

Georgetown College First-Year Students Only

Text
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global, X-List: HIST

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm TR Intercultural Center 210A Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Michael Kazin E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 34328 - IDST 010 - 12


DISCOVERING CULTURE THROUGH LANGUAGE

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

Coming to Georgetown means entering a swirling world of mixed cultures, languages, and ideas. You will have opportunities to learn languages foreign to you but native to millions. Each academic discipline has its own way of speaking about the world, and learning the “jargon” is an important step in mastering any subject. Different social spaces have their own forms of language, and you can reveal yourself as belonging (or not) by using certain terms. Debates about “political correctness” and “freedom of expression” are rooted in language. International relations and cross-cultural communication require interpretations and translations which are often controversial. We use language differently to communicate with people from different generations, genders, vocations, and locations. Language can signal upward or downward socio-economic mobility. Cultures are understood through language and created through language.

This course will examine the myriad ways that language use can shed light on the most human of activities – the making, shaping, and breaking of culture. Readings will include translations into English from several languages (Turkish, Arabic, Italian, and German). We will look at controversies about diverse forms of American English, starting with the Harlem Renaissance critique of Zora Neale Hurston’s use of Black Vernacular in her fictional and anthropological work, and continuing to contemporary discussions of rap lyrics. On a fieldtrip to Gallaudet University, we experience the visual language of American Sign Language (ASL) through poetry, theater, and music. In the global arena, we will examine the politics of language in international power relations, including for people without recognized nation states. In conjunction with a trip to the National Museum of the American Indian, we will consider what is lost when a language goes extinct. Crucial human concepts of physical and spiritual health are described through words and metaphors about food, the body, meditation/prayer, nature, and forms of illness and healing. We will explore some topics with activities such as shared meals, film viewing, nature walks, guest speakers, and guided meditation. Throughout the semester, we will attempt to understand a broad range of human cultural conceptions by closely studying language.

Exposure to different languages, including varieties of English, is not a requirement for this course, but would enhance a student’s ability to relate to these topics personally.


Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, Core: Diversity/Global, Core:HALC - Hum, Art, Lit, Cul, X-List: ANTH

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm MW White-Gravenor 204 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Sylvia W Onder E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 34327 - IDST 010 - 13


SCIENCE AND RELIGION

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

Science and religion have played powerful roles in shaping Western civilization: unparalleled resources – human, financial, and natural – have been invested in each of them, and they can be associated with many of the West’s proudest accomplishments and cruelest wrongdoings.

Taken together, science and religion conventionally conjure up images of conflict. They are envisioned as rival forces, associated with contending institutions and serving opposing interests. Historical controversies over the structure of the cosmos and modern-day debates over the science curriculum in U.S. high schools are offered in support of the conclusion that science and religion exist in an unrelenting state of warfare. The aim of this course is to test that generalization by examining the actual history, focusing on key episodes in which scientific and religious interests have intersected from Antiquity to the Present.

History is littered with vibrant discussions about such problems. Our goal is to get caught up in the vibrancy as we work to understand the concerns, confusions, and curiosities of these historical moments. We will be looking at case studies focusing on particularly “hot” historical debates. After laying groundwork in the debates of Antiquity and the Middle Ages, we will turn to the 16th– and 17th-century controversy over heliocentricism. By studying the actual hearings and trials, we will try to figure out how solid a win these were for scientific truth over religion’s superstitions. Regardless of what they achieved, they hardly ended the debates, and by the end of the semester we will have also considered controversies in our own day over the origins the cosmos and life, and yet newer questions – about the environment, for example – that the religiously and scientifically minded have a lot to say about … sometimes in conversation, sometimes in rivalry. Our task is to make sense of it.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global, X-List: HIST, X-List: MVST

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm MW St. Marys 120 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar David Collins E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 36224 - IDST 010 - 14


JESUIT FOUNDATIONS FOR JUSTICE

Georgetown College First-Year Students Only

Text
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Theology

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Intercultural Center 221B Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Ariel Glucklich E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 36225 - IDST 010 - 15


CREATING AND MAKING: THE MORAL CRAFT OF LIFE

Georgetown First Year Students Only

Humans have made and created things for their subsistence, their use, their enjoyment, and their fulfillment for millennia. We build the things we need for life and we also create meaning and express value in and through that making and creating. How we think about our skills and creative capacities, and how we cultivate them and to what ends, are primary ways in which we consider and shape how we ought to live. Human creativity is, fundamentally, a moral activity, involving choice, expression of earthly and divine goods, and pursues what we hold dear as our ultimate concerns. This Ignatius Seminar explores philosophical and theological visions of craft, labor, and creativity, and their connections to moral and political life, as a way to think about how our laboring, crafting, creating is a fundamental part of what constitutes the good life.

This seminar will explore human creativity as a moral and political activity through close reading of a number of philosophical and theological thinkers, including Aristotle, Gregory of Nyssa, Aquinas, Locke, Nietzsche, Marx, Arendt, Thoreau, Adorno and Horkheimer, Heidegger, Paul Tillich, Wendell Berry, Matthew Crawford, among others. We will also have a variety of “field” experiences, including the opportunities to meet and discuss these ideas with makers in our community—builders, chefs, architects, among others.

We will consider many questions about creativity, technology, and the meaning of life. What are humans capable of making and creating? What ought we do with our skills, goals, and capacities and what responsibility do we bear for how and what we make? How do capacities to create and make (crafts, tools, technology, things, cultures, homes, art, food, political institutions, ourselves) create meaning and value? What are the demands upon creativity: is there a natural or transcendental goal to our making, or is it pure utility and convention? What are the limits and dangers to our making? What is the temporal meaning of creating artifacts and tools in a fluctuating, dynamic world? What are the theological implications? How is politics itself a type of creation? How are creating and self-reliance a mode of politics? How do economic practices impinge upon this creativity? The course will be conducted mostly through discussion and in-depth analysis of the assigned readings. Students should be prepared to participate actively, based on a thoughtful reading of the texts.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core:HALC - Hum, Art, Lit, Cul

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 12:30 pm - 3:00 pm R Intercultural Center 119 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Michael J Kessler E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 38139 - IDST 010 - 17


BLACKNESS AND THE FOUNDATIONS OF POWER

Georgetown College First-Year Students Only

This seminar explores the nature of oppression through a lens of political theory. As the Movement for Black Lives grows and transforms, African American participants continue to wrestle with their diverse and sometimes nonexistent commitments to liberation from oppression. And although struggles for racial justice are ongoing, history has proven that many resistance leaders engage in destructive prejudices and their organizations promote narrow notions of freedom. How do we understand people who claim to support progressive movements while rejecting the people fighting them? Can we separate people passively upholding oppressions when the societies they live in are built on domination? And is it possible to rehabilitate and reintegrate those who have only submitted to marginalization because they can imagine no way around its historical and future existence? This seminar is devoted to addressing these and related questions.

Participants in the seminar will gain a broad introduction to interdisciplinary perspectives on power, social change, and revolutionary praxis. Conversations will draw on science-fiction literature, queer studies, political theory, documentary films, and history – each under the banner of African American Studies towards examining the conceptual foundations of domination, resistance, and justice. Specifically, the course uses the theories and perspectives of various African Americans to provide a more general understanding of the social movements, political ideologies, participatory and civic engagement of today and for the future. The course will focus on the impact of African American political thought in anti-oppressive Black freedom struggles surrounding women’s anti-violence, LGBTQIA+ rights, union and working class struggles, environmental justice, the digital divide, gun violence, prison abolition, disability advocacy and support for sex workers.

Our goal is to build a foundation of knowledge that is intellectually thorough, conceptually precise, and training for theoretical analyses. The seminar utilizes a variety of active learning strategies, so everyone should be prepared for engaged participation in each session.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, X-List: AFAM, X-List: GOVT

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Intercultural Center 219B Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Marcus E Board E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 38140 - IDST 010 - 18
Georgetown College First-Year Students Only

WITCHES

Registration requires permission of instructor.

What is a witch? This seminar engages this question in a wide-ranging exploration of the phenomenon of witchcraft in Europe, Africa, and the Americas over the course of several centuries. It looks at witchcraft both as a set of practices and beliefs and as something that could be transformed into a crime by changing ideas and by cultural collisions. We will explore witchcraft within the Christian tradition in Europe and beyond, including the variety of beliefs held by Africans and Native Americans and the impact of colonization and cultural contact on the expression of those beliefs. We will read about witchcraft in iconic places, such as Salem and Germany, as well as less familiar locales, ranging from Iceland to New Mexico. Along the way students will meet “witches” as diverse as shamans and Jesuit priests, midwives and healers, children and the elderly. The seminar will introduce students to original trial records and other surviving primary sources. Students will have the opportunity to carry out independent research.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, Core: Diversity/Global, X-List: HIST

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm TR White-Gravenor 209 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Amy E Leonard E-mail, Alison F Games E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 38141 - IDST 010 - 19


HARLEM RENAISSANCE: IN GLOBAL AND AMERICAN HISTORY

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

This course will review African American history through the lens of the Harlem Renaissance, one of the most creative periods artistically in American—and indeed—world history. In great part initiated by Howard University philosopher Alain Locke “The New Negro Renaissance,” the 1920’s and 1930’s, ushered in a remarkable flowering of literature, art, music— especially jazz—dance, and literature.

Using these expressive manifestations we will explore both the folk traditions and the new creations of Black artists and writers. We will examine how music, literature, poetry, and art reflected reality and was used as a guidepost during the Great Migration, when two million black people migrated from Southern states to escape lynchings and economic deprivation. These African Americans joined their Northern sisters and brothers in the quest for jobs, decent housing and education for themselves and their offspring.

We will trace the yearnings for dignity and equality using the expressive cultures of the African American people. In addition to class readings, we will weekly listen to music, view audio clips of live performances, and hear what the musicians themselves have to say. And, most importantly, we have fun as we learn and discuss our ideas and findings.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, X-List: HIST

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm TR White-Gravenor 403A Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Maurice Jackson E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 38143 - IDST 010 - 21


THE SEARCH

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

In addition to the times listed, this course will meet 12:30-2:00pm on five Fridays to be chosen at the beginning of the term.

“The search is what anyone would undertake if he were not sunk in the everydayness of his own life. To become aware of the possibility of the search is to be onto something. Not to be onto something is to be in despair.” So said Binx Bolling, the energetic, perceptive narrator of Walker Percy’s novel The Moviegoer—a definitive account of the personal search as a natural and necessary step on the way to adulthood.

The literature of our time is rich in accounts of the personal search—books in which author and reader venture forth together in order to make sense of their lives and the world around them (and also to keep “everydayness” at bay). In this course we’ll follow the possibilities of the search as they’re set out in some particularly artful and affecting nonfiction books. Our aim will be to understand the personal search and the different ways a search can be framed through the art of narrative. I hope to convey my own conviction that the narrative of the search is at once a straightforward approach to self-understanding and a complex, rewarding process that joins us to one another and to traditions of storytelling that go back to human culture’s beginnings.

Meeting weekly, we’ll read six to eight books (drawn from those below) and move through a series of searches together. There’s search for self, as seen in memoirs by Richard Rodriguez, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Barack Obama. There’s the search for roots and a sense of place, as undertaken by Sarah Broom in New Orleans and Bill McKibben in the Green Mountains and the Adirondacks. There’s the search for justice, which prompted Helen Prejean to take up the fight against the death penalty (described in Dead Man Walking) and inspired Samantha Power to become a war reporter and a diplomat (as she recounts in The Education of an Idealist). There’s the search for the truth of what happened—whether in Northern Ireland (as in Say Nothing), in the workplace (as in She Said), or in the laboratory (as in Lab Girl). There’s the search for consolation after loss, such as Edwidge Danticat and Joan Didion sought. And there’s the search for the spirit—for the meaning of it all—in religion and the wisdom traditions.

This is a course suited for aspiring writers, and also for students who’d simply like to keep reading for pleasure amid all the obligations of the first-year experience at Georgetown. We’ll read and discuss pertinent essays and journalism alongside the assigned books; and students, in addition to writing critical essays, will compose and revise brief personal narratives in which they find words for their own search.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, Core:HALC - Hum, Art, Lit, Cul

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm R Maguire 104 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Paul Elie E-mail


Ignatius Seminar - 39027 - IDST 010 - 22


Women's History at Georgetown

Georgetown College First Year Students Only

In 1789, Georgetown University was founded by the Jesuits as a school for young men, but that’s only part of the story. This course will examine the rich and largely hidden history and legacy of women at Georgetown University. Inspired by the 50th Anniversary of women’s admission to Georgetown College in 2019, this course will allow us to study, interpret, archive and amplify women’s story here. Drawing from the Georgetown Slavery Archive, online editions of The Hoya, visits to the University Archives, oral histories, social media, and more, together we can build a story that includes not just students, but laborers both enslaved and free, nurses, faculty and administrators.

As a first-year experience, this seminar will introduce you to Georgetown’s history and culture, while helping to create a more inclusive version of it. Starting with Sukey, who in 1792 became the first enslaved woman to appear in Georgetown’s ledgers, we will study those both enslaved and free who lived and worked at Georgetown, the women who were nuns and nurses in service here, and other “firsts”—first undergraduates, first graduate students, first faculty and so on. This story is one of both inclusion and exclusion. We will have guest speakers with wide ranges of experiences at Georgetown, from college alumnae, to retired staff and pioneering faculty.

In the first fall of your first year at Georgetown—in remarkable times—you will have the real opportunity to make and document history in a community of scholarship and collegiality. While each of you will pursue independent research projects, we will also engage in a collective effort to make Georgetown’s women’s history public through oral history, podcasts, and an online archive. Along the way, you will learn to write better, think more deeply, and learn how to to analyze historical sources with discernment, integrity, and empathy. We will learn that history is not just one thing after another, but an interpretation that depends on whose voice is heard and collected. You will also learn the nuts and bolts of library and online research, which will help you throughout your career at Georgetown and beyond.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, X-List: HIST

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 4:30 pm T Intercultural Center 205B Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Katherine Benton-Cohen E-mail



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