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Class Schedule Listing

 

Fall 2022
May 22, 2022
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Prosem:Liberals&Conservatives - 41870 - INAF 100 - 01
In a time of political hyper-polarization, the labels "liberal" and "conservative" have become less contrasting approaches to governance and more ways of talking about political identities--especially tools for identifying one's political opponents. This course will examine the origins of this divide by turning to some of the foundational texts in history and political philosophy that are said to underlie these contrasting traditions, both in the United States and elsewhere. We will ask about the usefulness of these labels as terms for actual political preferences and endeavor to understand the causes and effects of polarization in history and in contemporary public life. As an intensive reading and writing seminar, this course will require weekly or near-weekly essays for portions of the semester, as well as active participation in class discussions.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

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Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Intercultural Center 207A Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Charles E King E-mail


Prosem: Islam & the West - 32464 - INAF 100 - 04
Here is the abstract: Academics, journalists and policy makers regularly refer to Islam, the West and the knotty question of Islam and the West. Stepping outside of 'Islam' and 'the West', however, we see that neither is a concrete and unchanging reality. Both exist as ideas conceived by particular communities, internally disputed and perceived by others. This course will examine this conceptual knot through in-depth readings on how societies in the US (and Western Europe) understand ‘liberalism,’ ‘secularism’ and ‘Islam/Muslims as threat’ within the context of debates over the nature of Islam, the West and their proper relationship. We will also use travel literature as a way to explore how visitors from one of these civilizations experienced the other. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RYoCAAW/jonathan-brown
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 1:30 pm T Intercultural Center 207B Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Jonathan Andrew Clevelan Brown E-mail


Proseminar: Politics of Data - 11672 - INAF 100 - 05
Data and algorithms are everywhere and affect everyday life. They include facial recognition, social media, policing, welfare programs and transportation. The course will introduce students to the social and political impacts of the use of data and algorithms in society. We will discuss concepts of bias, discrimination, fairness, auditing, racism, hacking and whistleblowing. Students will develop a critical understanding of data and algorithms in concrete, real world settings. Students will become aware of the politics of production, use and deployment of data. Finally, the course will examine strategies for getting producers of data and algorithms accountable. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014SZnEAAW/rajesh-veeraraghavan; www.rajeshveera.org
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 12:00 pm R White-Gravenor 213 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Rajesh Veeraraghavan E-mail


Prosem: Pandemic Responses - 32465 - INAF 100 - 07
Pandemic Responses: Practice and Ethics. The COVID-19 crisis tests us all, from each family to multilateral, global institutions. Some tests are immediate and practical.They include, for example, performance in mobilizing and reorienting health systems, delivery of messages and adapting them to circumstances, developing vaccines and implementing vaccinations, and mobilizing financial resources and decent safety nets. Others present existential questions about the meaning of the crisis and what it suggests for future directions for humanity. Each challenge has important ethical dimensions. This Pro-seminar will explore a range of issues, starting with a definition of challenges and tracing how action and thinking on COVID-19 emergencies has evolved. The analysis of the 2020-2021 crisis will be set in the broader context of historic pandemics and challenges to public health. Finally the seminar will focus on how local and global institutions respond to humanitarian challenges, in the practical sense of which organizations were involved and how, and assessing their impact. The seminar explores human rights and ethical issues linked to the COVID-19 pandemic itself and to contemporary debates around humanitarian principles. As a bottom line, the seminar will ask what we are learning from an experience that each student and the professor has lived. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RXRgAAO/katherine-marshall
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 5:00 pm - 6:15 pm TR White-Gravenor 206 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Katherine Marshall E-mail


Prosem:Migratn in/from Africa - 31979 - INAF 100 - 08
Official statistics indicate about 30 million Africans migrate internationally every year. Where do they go, why do they move and what happens when they migrate? While the world talks of Syrians refugees in Turkey or Mexican migrants on the US border and the stateless Rohingya in Bangladesh, we will study Somali refugees in Kenya and Eritreans in Sudan, Libya and Italy, but also Zimbabwean professionals working in Botswana and South Africa, remittances sent home to Ghana, Ethiopians traveling through Djibouti and Malians and Nigerians in The Republic of the Congo. In this course, we will consider the historical patterns of migration in, across and out of Africa, as well as the role of politics, conflict and economic change in producing new patterns of migration in Africa. The focus will be on both voluntary and forced migration patterns, and themes such as globalization of labor, the African Diaspora, the sending of remittances, and the role of domestic politics and xenophobia. Through in-depth research, students will collectively explore the factors influencing human movement in a selected case of migration. Poetry, fiction, films and journalistic accounts will also be tools we will use to explore the complex 21st century patterns of migration. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RXWWAA4/
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 10:45 am TR Reynolds 130 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Lahra Smith E-mail


Prosem: Political Sci Fiction - 11675 - INAF 100 - 09
Harold Laswell, a political scientist writing in the 1930s, defined politics as “who gets what, when, and how.” Embedded within his definition are complex notions of power, distribution, process, and outcomes. One way political scientists seek to explain politics is through analysis of counterfactuals and scenarios, which are essentially thought experiments in which a researcher imagines a significant change in our empirical reality, and then proceeds to work out the implications of that change, using concepts and theories as tools of analysis. Counterfactuals are about past events; scenarios speak to the future. This, coincidentally, is what science fiction does too – imagine a small or big change in our past, present, or future, and then work out the effects of that change through fictional narrative. In this Proseminar, we examine key questions and concepts in political science – e.g. democracy, revolution, equality, power – through the prism of science fiction, drawing on great writers and filmmakers like Ursula K. Le Guin, Philip Dick, Octavia Butler, and Ridley Scott. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014Rr3FAAS/
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Healy 106 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Jeffrey J. Anderson E-mail


Prosem:Ppls & Pol Down Under - 11676 - INAF 100 - 10
Who are the people of Australia and New Zealand? The land down under, often portrayed as exotic and quirky, is home to 27.5 million people. Both countries describe themselves as ‘punching above their weight.’ Internationally competitive in numerous ways, both are certainly economically successful, especially given their small populations. Australia is the 13th largest economy by nominal GDP, while New Zealand ranks 55th. We often think we know Australia - “Throw another shrimp on the barbie,” “g’day mate,” funny hats and toilets that flush “the other way.” New Zealand is the home of hobbits and bungee jumping. These are some of the stereotypes people have of the “land down under.” The reality, of course, is far more complex, textured and interesting. Australia and New Zealand both share a lot with the United States, much of it unappreciated or unacknowledged. Australia has been described as “…America’s most reliable ally, and most valuable security partner in the Pacific basin for many years. Australia has fought beside the United States in every war during the last century….” New Zealand has often been characterized as a social laboratory of modern democracy. While sharing much with America, both these countries are unique and fascinating places. Who are the people down under? What concerns them? What drives them? Where are they going? And, what lessons can they share about governing the modern state? https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014Rj5LAAS/
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 10:45 am TR White-Gravenor 209 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Alan Tidwell E-mail


Prosem: Politics & Memory - 11677 - INAF 100 - 11
Collective memory is an important component for the identity, culture, and politics of many nations, minorities, institutions, and even corporations. Indeed, it is difficult to find a group where the influence of memory is not marked: from Jewish communities worldwide and the Holocaust; to the United States with our many wars and legacy of slavery and segregation; to Spain, Argentina, and Chile still trying to work through the effects of the last dictatorships; to Germany and Japan with their pasts "that won't go away." This proseminar delves into the nature and effects of collective memory and working through the past in contemporary cases. We explore issues like shared identity, commemoration, effects on political values, and influences on domestic policy and international relations. Several texts, films, presentations and writing assignments structure the class. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RBI8AAO/eric-langenbacher-phd
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Domestic, Core: Diversity/Global

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Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 5:00 pm - 7:30 pm W Intercultural Center 206A Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Eric A. Langenbacher E-mail


Prosem: Development of India - 41465 - INAF 100 - 13
India, the world’s largest democracy with 1.3 billion people, is a world in itself. The people of speak nearly a thousand languages, follow several different faiths -- including Hinduism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, and Sikhism -- and are organized into a staggering number of ethnic and caste communities. On the economic side, India has a billion mobile phone subscriptions (almost), a rapidly growing population of millionaires and has even completed a mission to Mars at a fraction of the cost of the Hollywood movie. Yet it also has the largest numbers of malnourished children in the world, the most out of school children in the world, and more than 400 million people living in poverty. If you visit an Indian city, you will see luxury cars juxtaposed with emaciated beggars, the world’s nicest hotels with sprawling slums outside, and ancient temples next to solar powered call centers! How did India get here? This class will try to make sense of these patterns and contrasts in modern India. We will look back into its history to find the threads of economic, political, cultural and social explanations for this unique story. We will read academic texts from many disciplines, and also make some forays into fictional texts and journalistic writings. We will also watch films! These will help us see that India’s economic story is intricately woven along with its geography, history, politics, society, and culture. Though we will often look at data and numbers, the course will highlight the human side of India’s development story as seen in film, fiction, art and narratives of people’s actual lives. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RYK7AAO/shareen-joshi
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Intercultural Center 219B Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Shareen Joshi E-mail


Prosem: Free Spch & Frgn Polcy - 32468 - INAF 100 - 14
This seminar will take up Free Speech, one of the most precious democratic values embodied in the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and the degree to which it should or should not play a role in the formulation and conduct of American Foreign Policy. In addition to examining the evolving legal, political, and philosophical framework for Free Speech in the United States, especially over the past 100 years, and comparing it to practices elsewhere in the world, we will consider a number of key case studies and other complex questions, including: 1) The Pentagon Papers case of 1971 and subsequent conflicts over the proper boundaries, if any, for media coverage of Foreign Policy (Wikileaks, Edward Snowden, et al.) 2) The recent murder of a Saudi-born columnist for The Washington Post by a regime allied with the United States, and the consequences 3) Efforts by many governments around the world to control the Internet 4) The longstanding movement to make human rights a pillar of American diplomacy 5) The extent to which Foreign Policy should reflect domestic public opinion 6) International ramifications of speech conflicts in athletics, entertainment, and popular culture The class will be discussion-based, with an emphasis on class participation and frequent writing assignments. https://isd.georgetown.edu/profile/sanford-j-ungar/
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 4:30 pm W Healy 106 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Sanford J Ungar E-mail


Prosem: Policy & Strategy - 11683 - INAF 100 - 17
This course will be an examination of the historic application of the traditional elements of national power: diplomatic, economic and military, in the pursuit of national goals in crises. We will begin with general and theoretical discussions to form a systematic framework for case studies. Then, we will progress through nine case studies, varying from the Peloponnesian Wars to the present day, to apply this framework. Discussion, vice lecture or formal presentation, will be the normal mode of the class. Our emphases will be on research, critical reading, analytical thinking, and their communication through seminar discussion, oral presentation, and discursive writing. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RfPeAAK/keith-hrebenak
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm T Healy 106 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Keith P Hrebenak E-mail


Prosem: Global Pathways - 11684 - INAF 100 - 18
Global Pathways – Competing Visions: You enroll in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University presumably because you want to dedicate your professional life to improving human well-being at home and abroad. As you begin your studies, you are keenly aware: the Global Covid Pandemic warrants prominence in future history books; the Climate Crisis intensifies; and these developments expose the structural inequality, racism, and political polarization that permeate too many national and international institutions, even within liberal democratic regimes. Perhaps you have heard some Authoritarian leaders gloat that the liberal regime type has failed. (They might point to the January 6 2021 attack on the US Capitol as proof positive.). Against this backdrop, you need to develop deep skills of critical analysis and a coherent framework for moral evaluation of policy choices in response to responses to complex global concerns. Your SFS Proseminar is one way to begin. Several questions shape readings selected for this Proseminar: What are the moral consequences of founding a liberal democracy (or a Catholic and Jesuit University) on slavery? How might we think through the concern that Liberal Democratic Regimes world-wide are sliding toward Fascism? On what evidence might we assess whether the Political Islam Regime type is an inherent threat to liberal democracy and/or human well-being? What moral convictions ought to shape and constrain policies designed to counter or adapt to Climate Change? https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RfveAAC/marilyn-mcmorrow
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 10:45 am TR Reynolds 133 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Marilyn McMorrow E-mail


Prosem:Rise of Glbl Capitalism - 11686 - INAF 100 - 19
This proseminar explores the emergence and evolution of the modern global economic order connecting financiers, merchants, traders, and states, over the course of four centuries. In particular, it examines the important role governments have played in shaping global patterns of finance and commerce. Among the topics to be explored: what explains the rise of the first financial centers? Under what conditions did the global economy become more financially “integrated?” How have nations managed their international monetary relationships? How have governments responded to crises and periods of economic distress? What is unique about the experience of “developing” nations? Finally, what imbalances exist in global capitalism today? https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RrL8AAK/raj-desai
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 4:30 pm T Intercultural Center 209A Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Raj M Desai E-mail


Prosem: Global Hist of Capital - 11687 - INAF 100 - 20
This course introduces students to the historical study of capital in global frames. We will explore questions raised in the historical examination of capital in motion, as investable wealth moves across the planet, transforming places into property, things into commodities, and people into labor. In addition to important texts on capital by influential thinkers, Adam Smith and Karl Marx amongst others,  we will read historical monographs on the transformation of sugar from a luxury good to a mass commodity and the primary source of calories for Britain’s industrial laborers; the lives and resistances of black men and women for sale in New Orleans slave markets; and smugglers and pirates evading the British Imperial authority in the Indian Ocean. Through monographs and other assigned readings, we will trace the arc of the history of capital across the surface of the planet: from silver mines and slave plantations in the Americas to the merchant vessels plying the Atlantic and Indian Oceans; from the factories and mills of industrial Europe to the peasant farms in Europe’s Asian and African colonies; from the nineteenth century era of British imperialist capitalist dominance to the twentieth century rise of American capital. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/0031Q000021yc0bQAA/tariq-ali
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 10:45 am TR Intercultural Center 113 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Tariq Ali E-mail


Prosem:Rise of US/PacificPower - 32466 - INAF 100 - 21
This course is an introduction to the historical development of U.S. relations with East Asia from the 18th century to the end of the Cold War. Arriving at the Pacific coast through westward territorial expansion and maritime access to the China market, the United States initially entered East Asia as an outside power. Unlike many European countries, however, U.S. relations with East Asia quickly extended to all dimensions of social life through the trans-Pacific exchanges of people, goods, and ideas. These interregional interactions beneath and beyond the governmental levels reflected and also reinforced government policies and geopolitical events such as wars and treaties. This mutual constitution of the "political" and the "social" integrated the United States into East Asia as its full member. In this course, we will seek to understand the close linkage between inter-governmental and inter-social relations, and between "hard" and "soft" power, behind the rise of the United States as a Pacific power. A geographical focus will be placed on the region's core (China, Japan, and Korea), but will be also extended to other parts of the Pacific world to situate America's growing regional presence in a larger context. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014TuREAA0/toshihiro-higuchi
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm MW Intercultural Center 223A Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Toshihiro Higuchi E-mail


Prosem:Rules-Based Global Econ - 32470 - INAF 100 - 22
A Rules-Based Global Economy: The Evolution of the Rules-Based Global Trading System: Global trade is more “rules-based” than ever before. The World Trade Organization (WTO) and over 300 free trade deals now overlap. Problems loom. The WTO’s Appellate Body has stopped working. The WTO’s future is in doubt. Deals like the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement are proliferating, leading to fears that they’ll undermine multilateralism. What is the future of the rules-based global economy? This proseminar takes up this question. It begins with the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, examines the rise of the WTO, and looks at how the institution interacts with modern free trade agreements. The proseminar introduces students to the political economy of international trade law. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014RAztAAG/marc-busch
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Core: Diversity/Global

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 12:15 pm MW Reiss 282 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Marc Busch E-mail


Prosem: Terrorism & Civil War - 40316 - INAF 100 - 23
Since the end of World War II, terrorist groups, insurgents, and other militants have killed tens of millions of people. Afghanistan, Nigeria, Ukraine, and Yemen are only a few examples of countries where disease, economic ruin, societal divisions, corruption or other problems accompany the devastation of war. In states as diverse as New Zealand, Norway, Sri Lanka, Iraq, and the United States, terrorists ranging from ISIS to white supremacists have conducted devastating attacks and reshaped societies. This course looks at terrorism and civil wars from multiple perspectives: international relations, economics, history, and literature, among others. The class will shift back and forth between scholarly discussions of issues such as terrorist logistics and intelligence gathering to different historical and current examples of these issues, such as the French colonial struggle in Algeria, the 2011 terrorist attack on Norway, and the ongoing U.S. intervention in Afghanistan. Like all proseminars, this class is designed to promote critical thinking, close reading of texts, development of research skills, expository writing, and speaking skills. It introduces you to undergraduate-level work at the best international affairs school in the world – a very high bar. The writing for this course is meant to be intensive and extensive, and when you are done, you will write better and be able to apply the skills you learn to your other courses at Georgetown. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014Rm9PAAS/daniel-byman
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 10:45 am MW Intercultural Center 208B Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Daniel Byman E-mail


Prosem: Music/Globaliz/Int Aff - 41435 - INAF 100 - 24
Music, Globalization, and International Affairs: The 21st century Internet has democratized the circulation of ideas within and beyond the nation-state. In this context, music serves as a means of both alternative ideas and a reinforcement of the established order to reinforce our experience of globalization. International organizations, government actors, NGOs, artists, and a range of activists (from religious to social) have invested in music for their own political, social, and economic ends. This ProSeminar will focus on the relationship between music and international affairs via diplomacy, conflict resolution, community building during a pandemic, social movements, national hegemony and protectionism, both on a local and global scale. It will draw on examples from the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, their diasporas and its globalization. More broadly, this course encourages you to rethink political power and nationalism beyond the nation-state, and the power of music as an agent of global transformation. Methodologically, the course will introduce students to sound and performance analysis, among other non-textual approaches to investigating the politics of culture. https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/0033600001kNVj3AAG/jessica-roda
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 10:45 am TR Walsh 399 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Jessica Roda E-mail


Future of Econ Dev in Africa - 41476 - INAF 100 - 25
The Future of Economic Development in Africa---What explains the persistence of poverty and underdevelopment in some countries around the world? How can countries accelerate economic growth? How will climate change and political crises impact the future of economic development around the globe? Primarily relying on examples from African countries, this class will introduce students to the drivers of economic development. The objective of the class is to provide students with a foundational understanding of how history, demographics, geography, state capacity, politics, and policy choices impact economic growth and development. In addition, students will develop the analytical skills needed to make sense of policy debates in international development and global compacts like the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000014StUfAAK/ken-opalo
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 10:45 am MW Reynolds 131 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Kennedy O Opalo E-mail


SFS Proseminar - 41591 - INAF 100 - 27
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:00 pm - 4:30 pm F Car Barn 205A Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Rochelle Davis E-mail


Prosem: Black Mirror - 41592 - INAF 100 - 28
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR White-Gravenor 409 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Katherine Fehr Chandler E-mail
Recitation 11:00 am - 12:15 pm F White-Gravenor 202 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Katherine Fehr Chandler E-mail


Prosem: Europe's 1968 - 41799 - INAF 100 - 29
From Paris to Prague, from Trento to Copenhagen, the late 1960s witnessed an explosion of protest, a moment of political and cultural radicalism that challenged the authority of governments, institutions, and ways of thought. These protests often transcended the realm of conventional politics: across the European continent long hair, colorful and exotic clothing, and ostentatiously casual behavior became distinctive marks of a rebelling youth. To this day, the shorthand ‘1968’ conjures up powerful images: barricades made of paving stones in the Latin Quarter of Paris; large-scale anti-Vietnam war protests in numerous cities; posters of the Argentine Marxist revolutionary Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara; state officials held hostage by left-wing terrorists, naked German communards, and Soviet tanks rolling into Prague on 21 August 1968, ending the so-called ‘Prague Spring’ that had inspired hopes in Socialist reform across much of the Eastern bloc and the Western New Left. In spite of this shared iconography, the political goals and protest repertoires of activists in the liberal democracies of the West, the socialist dictatorships of the East, and right-wing regimes of the South also differed in significant ways. Different groups within European societies also experienced 1968 in divergent ways: people’s experiences were shaped by factors such as class, gender, ethnicity, political beliefs, and generation. Much of the proseminar will focus on the beliefs, motivations, and experiences of individual actors to shed light on what united and divided European activists around 1968.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Walsh 399 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Anna von der Goltz E-mail


Prosem:Fictions, Politics & IR - 41873 - INAF 100 - 30
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 10:45 am TR White-Gravenor 411 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Jacques Berlinerblau E-mail


Prosem: Comedy, Blasphemy & IR - 41820 - INAF 100 - 31
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm MW Walsh 399 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Jacques Berlinerblau E-mail


Jews&Muslims:Rethink Narrative - 42580 - INAF 100 - 32
This course explores the modern history of Jewish-Muslim relations beyond the security paradigm. Students will examine Jewish experiences in the Islamic world from the 7th century to the present, and discover the interconnected and entangled world of Jews and Muslims in places including Morocco, Iran, France, and North America. Through its exploration of historical scholarship, this course will help students rethink common narratives surrounding Jewish-Muslim relations in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will also learn about the social categories of religion and secularism. Throughout the course, students will investigate a subject relating to Muslim-Jewish relations (historical or contemporary) of their choice. They will present their research in a creative format (podcast, video, writing, art project, poetry), in addition to learning the tools to create a one-episode podcast.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 01, 2022 to Sep 02, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 9:30 am - 12:00 pm W Intercultural Center 107 Aug 24, 2022 - Dec 17, 2022 Seminar Jessica Roda E-mail


SFS Proseminar - 11689 - INAF 100 - 70
Registration in this class requires instructor/departmental approval This course is for First Year students only. Every first year student in the BSFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are: · To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues · To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS · To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors · To explore new ideas WRITING OBJECTIVES This seminar will help you: • Use writing as a tool for inquiry to discover and integrate new ideas • Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences • Practice writing as a multifaceted, iterative process that involves planning and creating a draft, considering feedback from readers, and revision • Deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency • Adapt your writing in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations • Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 11, 2022 to Jul 29, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm TU Georgetown Building-Qatar Jul 24, 2022 - Nov 08, 2022 Seminar Ian Almond E-mail


SFS Proseminar - 11690 - INAF 100 - 71
Registration in this class requires instructor/departmental approval This course is for First Year students only. Every first year student in the BSFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are: · To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues · To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS · To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors · To explore new ideas WRITING OBJECTIVES This seminar will help you: • Use writing as a tool for inquiry to discover and integrate new ideas • Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences • Practice writing as a multifaceted, iterative process that involves planning and creating a draft, considering feedback from readers, and revision • Deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency • Adapt your writing in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations • Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 11, 2022 to Jul 29, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:30 am - 12:45 pm MW Georgetown Building-Qatar Jul 24, 2022 - Nov 08, 2022 Seminar Sonia Alonso Saenz de Oger E-mail


SFS Proseminar - 11691 - INAF 100 - 72
Registration in this class requires instructor/departmental approval This course is for First Year students only. Every first year student in the BSFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are: · To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues · To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS · To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors · To explore new ideas WRITING OBJECTIVES This seminar will help you: • Use writing as a tool for inquiry to discover and integrate new ideas • Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences • Practice writing as a multifaceted, iterative process that involves planning and creating a draft, considering feedback from readers, and revision • Deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency • Adapt your writing in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations • Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences. The Story of Humankind This course covers the story of humankind from prehistory to the future. The course meets twice each week. Students will read 50-100 pages before each class, at which we will discuss the readings for that week, focusing on the fundamental questions of the nature of human beings, their modes of production and social and political organization and concluding with a look into the future and how human beings may or may not create their own successor beings. Students will write and discuss three five-page papers and take a final oral examination
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 11, 2022 to Jul 29, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm TU Georgetown Building-Qatar Jul 24, 2022 - Nov 08, 2022 Seminar Mehran Kamrava E-mail


SFS Proseminar - 11692 - INAF 100 - 73
Registration in this class requires instructor/departmental approval This course is for First Year students only. Every first year student in the BSFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are: · To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues · To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS · To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors · To explore new ideas WRITING OBJECTIVES This seminar will help you: • Use writing as a tool for inquiry to discover and integrate new ideas • Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences • Practice writing as a multifaceted, iterative process that involves planning and creating a draft, considering feedback from readers, and revision • Deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency • Adapt your writing in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations • Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences. This course seeks to study women who have worked as journalists in all kinds of mass media from as far back as the nineteenth century to the present century. It explores themes such as glass ceilings and the nature of intersectional identities in the journalistic profession among others by looking at the experiences and journalistic output of women journalists in the Americas, Africa, Asia, Europe and Oceania over several decades
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 11, 2022 to Jul 29, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
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Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 11:30 am - 12:45 pm MW Georgetown Building-Qatar Jul 24, 2022 - Nov 08, 2022 Seminar Vasiliki Kynourgiopoulou E-mail


SFS Proseminar - 22740 - INAF 100 - 74
Registration in this class requires instructor/departmental approval This course is for First Year students only. Every first year student in the BSFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are: · To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues · To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS · To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors · To explore new ideas WRITING OBJECTIVES This seminar will help you: • Use writing as a tool for inquiry to discover and integrate new ideas • Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences • Practice writing as a multifaceted, iterative process that involves planning and creating a draft, considering feedback from readers, and revision • Deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency • Adapt your writing in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations • Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 11, 2022 to Jul 29, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm TU Georgetown Building-Qatar Jul 24, 2022 - Nov 08, 2022 Seminar Rory David Miller E-mail


SFS Proseminar - 34925 - INAF 100 - 75
Registration in this class requires instructor/departmental approval This course is for First Year students only. Every first year student in the BSFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are: · To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues · To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS · To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors · To explore new ideas WRITING OBJECTIVES This seminar will help you: • Use writing as a tool for inquiry to discover and integrate new ideas • Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences • Practice writing as a multifaceted, iterative process that involves planning and creating a draft, considering feedback from readers, and revision • Deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency • Adapt your writing in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations • Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 11, 2022 to Jul 29, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm TU Georgetown Building-Qatar Jul 24, 2022 - Nov 08, 2022 Seminar Phoebe Musandu E-mail


SFS Proseminar - 35281 - INAF 100 - 76
Registration in this class requires instructor/departmental approval This course is for First Year students only. Every first year student in the BSFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are: · To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues · To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS · To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors · To explore new ideas WRITING OBJECTIVES This seminar will help you: • Use writing as a tool for inquiry to discover and integrate new ideas • Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences • Practice writing as a multifaceted, iterative process that involves planning and creating a draft, considering feedback from readers, and revision • Deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency • Adapt your writing in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations • Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences.
Associated Term: Fall 2022
Registration Dates: Apr 11, 2022 to Jul 29, 2022
Levels: Undergraduate

Main Campus  
Seminar Schedule Type
3.000 Credits
View Course Description
View Syllabus

Scheduled Meeting Times
Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors
Seminar 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm TU Georgetown Building-Qatar Jul 24, 2022 - Nov 08, 2022 Seminar Amira E Sonbol E-mail



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